Discover inland Cornwall

Cornwall is world-famous for its spectacular coastline, and rightly so. The Atlantic swell attracts intrepid surfers and bodyboarders, while the gentler waves of the south coast lend themselves perfectly to kayaking, SUP and other watersports.

Top Ten Cornish Ports

Everyone loves a wander around a Cornish quayside or harbour, but few realise that many of the buildings now converted to apartments or restaurants were once industrial buildings...

The Tin Coast

Kicking off a new series of blogs where we focus on different parts of Cornwall, we head down to the far west to explore the Tin Coast...

The Tamar Valley

Separating Cornwall from Devon (or some say England) the River Tamar rises within three miles of the north Cornish coast above Bude and flows south to enter the English Channel in Plymouth Sound.

Mevagissey; a safe harbour

Narrow streets and steep valley sides lead you down to the centre of the old Mevagissey, where the distinctive twin harbour provides a safe haven for the fishing boats that land their daily catch of skate, lobster, plaice and sole. Mevagissey was built on fish, in the 1800s and early 1900s it prospered on the back of the abundant source of pilchards (sardines) caught in local waters.

Discover the Tamar Valley

The River Tamar divides Cornwall from the rest of England for all but three miles between the source and the north Cornish coast. It runs for 60 miles down to Plymouth Sound, winding its way through rich farmland and areas of industrial history, now with World Heritage Status. Much of the area is also part of the Tamar Valley AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty).

Let’s Visit Cornwall’s Webcams

In these difficult days we have been spending more time on-line dreaming about where we would rather be than at home. Even for those of us based in Cornwall, we have been limited to where we can go until recently.

Which is why webcams have become so popular. I for one, had my second screen fixed on Mullion Cove for a few weeks at the start of lockdown, watching the tide roll out and roll in, the sun catching the island, or setting behind it, the occasional dog walker joining the lonely gull on the beach.

St Austell Bay: A Guide

The curve of St Austell Bay with its many sandy beaches is a haven for watersports and family holidays and is also fantastic for walking and cycling, with many woodlands and trails through a variety of landscapes. At its centre, the town of St Austell, has grown from the riches of the China Clay industry. Walk along Fore Street and you will discover the fine Holy Trinity Parish Church and opposite, the Italianate facade of the Market House. The town centre also has a cinema, restaurants, cafes and shops.