Discover inland Cornwall

Cornwall is world-famous for its spectacular coastline, and rightly so. The Atlantic swell attracts intrepid surfers and bodyboarders, while the gentler waves of the south coast lend themselves perfectly to kayaking, SUP and other watersports.

The Tin Coast

Kicking off a new series of blogs where we focus on different parts of Cornwall, we head down to the far west to explore the Tin Coast...

The Tamar Valley

Separating Cornwall from Devon (or some say England) the River Tamar rises within three miles of the north Cornish coast above Bude and flows south to enter the English Channel in Plymouth Sound.

The Kernow Way

Wherever we go, and whatever we do, we have an impact. Let's make sure it’s a positive one. Do it #thekernowway. Clean Cornwall is asking Cornish residents, visitors and business owners to consider how we can all minimise our impact as we step into one of the busiest summers we've ever had.

So whether you are a local, or here on holiday.. we all have a shared responsibility to look after this special place.

We call it the Kernow Way

In Cornwall we say 'Doing it dreckly'.

The River Fowey

Our guide to one of Cornwall's finest and most varied rivers, from sea to moor.

Protecting Cornwall’s Waterways

Protecting Cornwall’s Waterways with Jules Phelps – Encounter Cornwall

Golant is an especially tranquil stretch of the River Fowey, perfect for canoeing and stand-up Paddleboarding (SUP). As such, it’s the lifeblood of Jules Phelps’ business, and she’s determined to protect it in any way possible.

Final Straw Campaign – Pat Smith

They call her Action Nan for her tireless environmental campaigning. But for 72-year-old Pat Smith, it’s as much about the small gestures as the grand ones – saying no to a plastic straw with your drink or remembering to take a bag for life to the supermarket.

“We all need to get off our backsides and do something,” she says with characteristic firmness. “If every single one of us does one thing, it all adds up to big change.”

How to safely do a Beach Clean

The highest point on a beach the tide reaches is called the strandline. This is where the waves deposit items such a seaweed, natural debris, stranded marine life and, unfortunately, plastics.