Exploring Truro’s Green Spaces

While its Victorian cathedral draws visitors from far and wide, Truro has plenty of appeal for those willing to venture beyond.......

The Garden of Eden

In light of his failing health, a Buddhist monk grew fearful that his garden of rare camellias would have no one to look after them once he passed away; believed to have as many as 100 to 300 species, the Japanese flowers are commonly known for their spirals of dainty pink petals, not dissimilar to delicate pinecones that flutter in the breeze.

Mevagissey; a safe harbour

Narrow streets and steep valley sides lead you down to the centre of the old Mevagissey, where the distinctive twin harbour provides a safe haven for the fishing boats that land their daily catch of skate, lobster, plaice and sole. Mevagissey was built on fish, in the 1800s and early 1900s it prospered on the back of the abundant source of pilchards (sardines) caught in local waters.

Cornish Gardens that you might not have heard of….

I am sure you are aware that Cornwall has some great gardens, from the world famous Eden Project to the glorious spring gardens like Trebah and Heligan. But there are also plenty of smaller gardens that often get overlooked as we head, understandably, to the big names.
So here’s a walk through the lawns and raised beds of some of the lesser known jewels in Cornwall’s horticultural glories.

We love Cornwall in the spring

Birds singing, newborn lambs, beautiful colours…oh, we just love Cornwall in the springtime and we’ll let you into a little secret, it’s one of the best times to visit. Here’s why...

See the first bluebells

If you only do one thing in May, come and experience breathtaking carpets of bluebells in Cornwall.