National Marine Week 2021

There are wonders to be found – buried in sparkling sand, under the greens, pinks and browns of weed in the rockpools, and beneath the shining ripples of our coastal waters. During The Wildlife Trusts’ summer celebration of all things coastal –National Marine Week – Cornwall Wildlife Trust is offering people of all ages the chance to join experts and volunteers as they seek out marine treasures. There’s so much to discover, from shells on the beach to dolphins and whales swimming by.

Final Straw Campaign – Pat Smith

They call her Action Nan for her tireless environmental campaigning. But for 72-year-old Pat Smith, it’s as much about the small gestures as the grand ones – saying no to a plastic straw with your drink or remembering to take a bag for life to the supermarket.

“We all need to get off our backsides and do something,” she says with characteristic firmness. “If every single one of us does one thing, it all adds up to big change.”

How to safely do a Beach Clean

The highest point on a beach the tide reaches is called the strandline. This is where the waves deposit items such a seaweed, natural debris, stranded marine life and, unfortunately, plastics.

A Collection of Cornish Coves

The dictionary states that a cove is 'a part of the coast where the land curves inwards so that the sea is partly enclosed' In Cornwall we have many, here's just a few you might like to explore.

Let’s Visit Cornwall’s Webcams

In these difficult days we have been spending more time on-line dreaming about where we would rather be than at home. Even for those of us based in Cornwall, we have been limited to where we can go until recently.

Which is why webcams have become so popular. I for one, had my second screen fixed on Mullion Cove for a few weeks at the start of lockdown, watching the tide roll out and roll in, the sun catching the island, or setting behind it, the occasional dog walker joining the lonely gull on the beach.

Sanctuaries by the Sea

All around the coast of Cornwall you will come across churches with maritime connections. Many of them have towers used as daymarks by sailors and fishermen to guide them safely back to harbour, others will be the resting place of those taken by the sea.  They have all been and continue to be a place of sanctuary, somewhere to shelter from the storm, be it the westerly winds or the troubles in your life.

Here's a selection of religious sites going around the coast from the far north to the south eastern corner.

 

Morwenstow Church:

Responsible dog ownership - it’s a lot more than picking up the poo!

Cornwall is a wonderful place to live, as well as visit, and with many people wishing to enjoy Cornwall with four-legged friends, it also has a high proportion of dog ownership. Many of our valued visitors also want to enjoy Cornwall with their pets, and this is especially welcome at the quieter times of the year and shoulder seasons, when you can enjoy different aspects of Cornwall.