Godrevy Beach

Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach, Hayle, West Cornwall
Godrevy Beach
Hayle
Cornwall
TR27 5ED
Dog Friendly

Godrevy Beach is at the far north-eastern end of three miles of golden sand stretching from Hayle. Owned by the National Trust, it takes the brunt of the Atlantic swell and is one of the more exposed beaches of the North coast.  From buckets and spades on sunny summer days to classic rugged Cornish splendour on a stormy winter's day, Godrevy offers the ultimate outdoor experience.

The sandy beach at Godrevy is connected to Gwithian beach at lower tides to create an impressive stretch of sand that can be explored at leisure. But remember to check the time of high water as hundreds of metres of sand all but disappear as the tide comes in and it's easy to be caught out. The beach terminates at the north end with a low rocky headland and the famous Godrevy lighthouse on an island just off the coast. In the summer months the rocks surrounding the island are a favourite spot for seals to rest

A cafe, hidden amongst the dunes beside the car park, provides drinks and snacks and there are toilets further to the north along the track.

Godrevy is owned and looked after by the National Trust who are able to care and conserve areas like this, thanks to their members, volunteers and donors.

The whole Godrevy area, from the beach to the headland, is a unique place for wildlife, with important habitats such as heathland and sand dunes, as well as the coastline with its beaches and cliffs. This varied habitat creates a landscape rich in flora and fauna and even the most casual visitor might spot black back gulls, fulmars, skylarks and grey seals on a short walk.

The National Trust want to protect the landscape and the wildlife that inhabits it, and so in recent years wider and more accessible paths have been created, while other areas have been roped off. This is to give nature a chance to reclaim what is theirs, whilst allowing us to still explore the area and enjoy the fantastic views.

Car park free to National Trust members. No overnight camping allowed.

Lifeguard cover from the 14th of May until the 25th of September (2022).

Please note: Dogs are welcome on this beach except during July and August (10am - 6pm) when a seasonal dog ban is in place. (2022)



Surfing: Given the right conditions the waves can be epic - long walling lefts and rights. It is also capable of holding a fair sized swell, up 8ft. However this doesn't mean you'll have an easy paddle out! The break is at it's best on a low tide where it can produce a fast hollow wave. It does work through the tide but becomes increasingly slopey and bouncy.

Godrevy is quite well known for its clean up sets that seem to come from nowhere and catch everybody out. The peak also moves around a fair bit which works both ways - you can spend all day chasing it around or alternatively sit and wait for the wave of the day to come and find you. For some reason the beach attracts weird forms of surf craft such as goat boats! 

Surf Report from Magic Seaweed

 

Did you know?

The author Virginia Woolfe was inspired by Godrevy Lighthouse when she was writing her 1927 novel ‘To The Lighthouse’. She could see it from her family’s holiday home in St Ives, and although the novel is actually set in the west of Scotland, there are many other influences from the landscape of St Ives Bay in the book.

 

Nearby Accommodation

Nearby Things To Do